Treatment response and athletic outcome of foals with tarsal valgus deformities: 39 cases (1988-1997). Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the response to various treatments and long-term outcome of foals with tarsal valgus deformities. DESIGN: Retrospective study. ANIMALS: 39 foals with tarsal valgus deformities. PROCEDURE: Data collected from medical records, included signalment, history, reason for admission, and clinical findings. Radiographic views of the tarsus were evaluated for incomplete ossification of tarsal bones and were classified as normal in appearance, type-I incomplete ossification, or type-II incomplete ossification. Treatment and athletic outcome were documented for each foal. RESULTS: Radiographic assessment revealed that 22 of 39 foals (56%) had concomitant tarsal valgus deformities and incomplete ossification of the tarsal bones. Eight of 19 foals with tarsal valgus deformities that were treated with periosteal stripping responded favorably. Foals < or = 60 days old were significantly more likely to respond to periosteal stripping than older foals. Five of 8 foals with tarsal valgus deformities that were treated with growth plate retardation responded favorably. Eleven of 21 foals with long-term follow-up performed as intended. Compared with foals with type-II incomplete ossification, foals with tarsal bones that had a normal radiographic appearance or type-I incomplete ossification were significantly more likely to perform as intended. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Foals with tarsal valgus deformities should have lateromedial radiographic views of the tarsus obtained to assess the tarsal bones for incomplete ossification, which will affect athletic outcome. Because foals with type-II incomplete ossification of the tarsal bones respond poorly to periosteal stripping alone, treatment by growth-plate retardation is recommended.

author list (cited authors)

  • Dutton, D. M., Watkins, J. P., Honnas, C. M., & Hague, B. A.

citation count

  • 22

publication date

  • November 1999