Social Support and Self-Esteem Effects on Psychological Adjustment in Children and Adolescents with Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Insulin-dependent juvenile diabetes mellitus (Type I diabetes) is a chronic disorder resulting from the inadequate production or utilization of insulin. The ongoing chronic strains of juvenile diabetes, such as the complex daily medical management requirements, acute exacerbations of the disease, and physical complications interact synergistically to produce a negative impact on psychological adjustment. In the present study, family and peer social support and self-esteem were investigates as mediating variables in the chronic strain-psychological adjustment relationship. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were utilized to test the model. For children, the model accounted for 46 percent of the variance in internalizing behavior problems and 35 percent of the variance in externalizing behavior problems. For adolescents, the model accounted for 54 percent of the variance in internalizing behavior problems and 25 percent of the variance in externalizing behavior problems. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for primary and secondary prevention efforts for chronically ill children and adolescents who are at increased risk for psychological adjustment problems. © 1989 by The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights reserved.

author list (cited authors)

  • Varni, J. W., Babani, L., Wallander, J. L., Roe, T. F., & Frasier, S. D.

citation count

  • 36

complete list of authors

  • Varni, James W||Babani, Lina||Wallander, Jan L||Roe, Thomas F||Frasier, S Douglas

publication date

  • April 1989