LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES AND ESCHERICHIA COLI O157:H7 INHIBITION IN VITRO BY LIPOSOME‐ENCAPSULATED NISIN AND ETHYLENE DIAMINETETRAACETIC ACID Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Encapsulation technologies that effectively reduce antimicrobial interaction with food components or protect antimicrobial compounds from food processing measures have the potential to improve the microbiological safety of ready-to-eat foods. Recent application of liposomes for the preservation of cheese has spurred research into their utility in other food matrices. To ascertain the feasibility of encapsulated antimicrobial for the control of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7 growth in a model system, nisin (5.0 and 10.0 μg/mL) and the chelator ethylene diaminetetraacetic acid were entrapped in phospholipid liposomes. While phosphatidylcholine (PC) liposomes did not produce significant inhibition of target pathogens, PC/phosphatidylglycerol 8/2 and 6/4 (mol%) produced significant inhibition of pathogens. Near-complete inhibition of E. coli O157:H7 with liposomal antimicrobials at concentrations below those reported necessary for unencapsulated antimicrobial and chelator suggests that liposomes may represent a powerful technology for the encapsulation of antimicrobials and the control of foodborne pathogens. © 2008, The Author(s).

author list (cited authors)

  • TAYLOR, T. M., BRUCE, B. D., WEISS, J., & DAVIDSON, P. M.

citation count

  • 57

publication date

  • May 2008

publisher