Meniscal injury following initial cranial cruciate ligament stabilization surgery in 26 dogs (29 stifles) Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: To describe clinical signs, arthroscopic findings, and outcome in a group of dogs undergoing second look arthroscopy for the treatment of meniscal tears following original surgery to correct a CCL deficient stifle joint. METHODS: The medical records of 26 dogs from the Veterinary Teaching Hospital at Texas A&M University and the Veterinary Orthopedic Center (Round Rock, Texas) that had second look arthroscopy for lameness following an original surgical procedure were reviewed. Pre-operative clinical findings, 2nd look arthroscopic findings and owner assessed outcome were documented. RESULTS: Postliminary bucket handle tears of the medial meniscus were detected in 22 (75.9%) cases. Other postliminary meniscal injuries included frayed caudal horn tears of the medial meniscus 6 (20.7%), and longitudinal tears of the lateral meniscus 1 (3.4%). An audible or palpable click was present in 27.6% of cases. An improvement or resolution of lameness was reported in 96.5% of cases reported. In conclusion, tears of the medial meniscus are a significant cause of lameness in dogs subsequent to surgery for cranial crucial ligament ruptures. Increased lameness or acute onset of lameness after surgery for cranial crucial rupture is a consistent finding. In rare cases, a palpable or audible click will be appreciated. Arthroscopic evaluation and partial meniscectomy improve or resolve lameness in the majority of cases. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Sudden or increased lameness in dogs with historical CCL stabilization surgery should be evaluated and treated arthroscopically for postliminary meniscal injury if another cause for lameness can not be determined.

author list (cited authors)

  • Case, J. B., Hulse, D., Kerwin, S. C., & Peycke, L. E.

citation count

  • 45

publication date

  • January 2008