In vitro analyses of the dysregulated R206H ALK2 kinase-FKBP12 interaction associated with heterotopic ossification in FOP. Conference Paper uri icon

abstract

  • A single recurrent mutation in the regulatory subdomain of a bone morphogenetic protein type I receptor kinase has been linked to heterotopic ossification in classic fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP). As a result of a substitution at 1 residue by only 1 other side chain (Arg206His) in just 1 of the 4 type I BMP receptors (ALK2/ACVR1), soft connective tissues progressively metamorphose through an endochondral process into cartilage that is replaced by bone. The substitution of arginine for histidine, also a basic residue yet with the singular property of ionization/protonation over the physiological pH range, led to the hypothesis of an aberrant, pH-sensitive switch mechanism for the ligand-independent activation of BMP signaling through the mutant receptor kinase in patients presenting with classic FOP. To test a potential aspect of the putative pH-dependent mechanism, i.e. loss of autoinhibition of the kinase mediated by the inhibitory protein FKBP12, in vitrointeraction analyses with purified wild-type and R206H ALK2 kinase and FKBP12 proteins were performed. Interactions between the kinases and inhibitory proteins were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively by native gel electrophoresis and HPLC size exclusion chromatography and with an optical biosensor (Octet; ForteBio). Binding of inhibitory protein by the R206H mutant was diminished 3-fold relative to the wild type kinase at a physiological pH, yet below this value (<~7.5) pronounced nonspecific interactions, particularly with the mutant, prevented comparative evaluations. In conclusion, substitution with histidine leads to partial loss of inhibition of the mutant type I receptor through diminished binding of FKBP12, which may act as a gradient reader in morphogenetic contexts.

author list (cited authors)

  • Groppe, J. C., Wu, J., Shore, E. M., & Kaplan, F. S.

publication date

  • January 1, 2011 11:11 AM