Oral administration of MSG increases expression of glutamate receptors and transporters in the gastrointestinal tract of young piglets Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Glutamate receptors and transporters, including T1R1 and T1R3 (taste receptor 1, subtypes 1 and 3), mGluRs (metabotropic glutamate receptors), EAAC-1 (excitatory amino acid carrier-1), GLAST-1 (glutamate-aspartate transporter-1), and GLT-1 (glutamate transporter-1), are expressed in the gastrointestinal tract. This study determined effects of oral administration of monosodium glutamate [MSG; 0, 0.06, 0.5, or 1 g/kg body weight (BW)/day] for 21 days on expression of glutamate receptors and transporters in the stomach and jejunum of sow-reared piglets. Both mRNA and protein levels for gastric T1R1, T1R3, mGluR1, mGluR4, EAAT1, EAAT2, EAAT3, and EAAT4 and mRNA levels for jejunal T1R1, T1R3, EAAT1, EAAT2, EAAT3 and EAAT4 were increased (P < 0.05) by MSG supplementation. Among all groups, mRNA levels for gastric EAAT1, EAAT2, EAAT3, and EAAT4 were highest (P < 0.05) in piglets receiving 1 g MSG/kg BW/day. EAAT1 and EAAT2 mRNA levels in the stomach and jejunum of piglets receiving 0.5 g MSG/kg BW/day, as well as jejunal EAAT3 and EAAT4 mRNA levels in piglets receiving 1 g MSG/kg BW/day, were higher (P < 0.05) than those in the control and in piglets receiving 0.06 g MSG/kg BW/day. Furthermore, protein levels for jejunal T1R1 and EAAT3 were higher (P < 0.05) in piglets receiving 1 g MSG/kg BW/day than those in the control and in piglets receiving 0.06 g MSG/kg BW/day. Collectively, these findings indicate that dietary MSG may beneficially stimulate glutamate signaling and sensing in the stomach and jejunum of young pigs, as well as their gastrointestinal function.

altmetric score

  • 7

author list (cited authors)

  • Zhang, J., Yin, Y., Shu, X. G., Li, T., Li, F., Tan, B., Wu, Z., & Wu, G.

citation count

  • 47
  • 48

publication date

  • November 2013