Modeling, Simulation, and Optimization of Postcombustion CO2 Capture for Variable Feed Concentration and Flow Rate. 1. Chemical Absorption and Membrane Processes Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Studies on leading technologies for industrial CO2 capture are performed. Each technology includes flue gas dehydration, capture of at least 90% of CO2 from the feed, and compression to almost pure CO 2 for sequestration at 150 bar. This paper presents the modeling, simulation, optimization, and energy integration of a monoethanolamine (MEA)-based chemical absorption process and a multistage membrane process over a range of feed compositions (1-70% CO2, 5.5-15% H2O, 5.5% O2, and the balance N2) and flow rates (0.1, 1, 5, and 10 kmol/s). A superstructure of process alternatives is developed to select the optimum dehydration strategy for the feed to each process. A rigorous simulation-based optimization model is proposed to determine the minimum annualized cost of the MEA-absorption process. The MEA-absorption process is energy integrated through heat exchanger network optimization. A novel mathematical model is developed for the optimization of multistage and multicomponent separation of CO2 using membranes, which can be also used for a range of membrane-based gas separation applications. The results showing the optimum investment, operating, and total costs provide a quantitative approach toward technology comparison and scaling up the absorption- and membrane-based CO2 capture from various CO 2 emitting industries. Explicit expressions for the investment and operating costs of each alternative postcombustion CO2 capture process as functions of feed flow rate and CO2 composition are also developed for the first time. This may assist the decision-makers in selecting the cost-appropriate technology for comprehensive carbon management by taking the diverse emission scenarios into consideration. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

author list (cited authors)

  • Hasan, M., Baliban, R. C., Elia, J. A., & Floudas, C. A.

publication date

  • January 1, 2012 11:11 AM